SWCS
October 25, 2014

2014 Annual Conference

  

 


 

4 days on the state of conservation and its future! 

 

Final Program Download

Abstract Book Download

View Presentations

Prichard Lecture Slides

Tuesday Plenary Slides (click below)

Merchant Slides
Echols Slides
Wheater Slides
Weller Slides


Presentations and Videos Now Available! 

PowerPoint presentations from the symposia and oral presentations are now available for viewing on the SWCS SlideShare page. You may access information here, or by copying and pasting this link in your brower http://www.slideshare.net/SWCSevents. For ease of searching, presentations are tagged by category and time of presentation. You may click on tags by scrolling down to the bottom left of the profile page.

If you are a presenter and your presentation does not appear on the SlideShare page, please contact events@swcs.org

 

2014 Pritchard Lecture:

Is Soil and Water Degradation Inevitable? Don’t Bet Your Life on it!
Richard Cruse, Iowa State University

 

International Waters: Protecting and Restoring Water Quality
Jamshed Merchant, Consulate General of Canada in Minneapolis; Andrew Manale, EPA (retired); Howard Wheater, Global Institute for Water Security; Alex Echols, Ecosystem Services Exchange; Wayne Honeycutt, USDA-NRCS

Videos courtesy of SWCS Southwest Region Director Mike Collins.

 

Check out the SWCS Facebook & Twitter pages for all #SWCS14ac discussions.

 
 

69th SWCS International Annual Conference

July 27-30, Lombard, Illinois

From the Great Lakes to the coast, our use of the land impacts major bodies of water. Whether it be the large freshwater lakes of the United States and Canada, the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean; or the other lakes, seas, and oceans of the world, these terminal waters tell the story of what is happening upstream. This year, we consider challenges and progress in nutrient management, erosion and sediment control, nonpoint source and watershed policy, and other issues influencing the health and productivity of our soils and large water bodies. We have an opportunity to reflect upon decades of hard work and to acknowledge the progress of land managers, farmers, advisors, and scientists. We can also recognize failure and emerging problems, with a focus on innovatively moving forward to develop and implement best practices and improve outcomes.  Collectively we can make waves in conservation by coming together to share ideas, explore opportunities, and face the challenge of our life on land and its impact on water. 

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